World Languages

(301) 649-2867
Resource Teacher: Kerri Galloway
Kerri_Galloway@mcpsmd.org
(301) 649-2869

Jump to: Departmental Goals | Courses

Academic support for World Languages is available during lunch and period 9 on Tuesdays, Wednesday, and Thursdays in room 172

The Staff:

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Amy Crumrine – Amy_A_Crumrine@mcpsmd.org
  • Shay Taylor – Shay_E_Taylor@mcpsmd.org

Arabic

  • Maysa Omar – Maysa_S_Omar@mcpsmd.org

French

  • Lucie Austin – Lucie_L_Austin@mcpsmd.org
  • Laura Bodin – Laura_V_Bodin@mcpsmd.org
  • Mbaya Subayi – Mbaya_K_Subayi@mcpsmd.org

Japanese

  • Yoko Zoll – Yoko_H_Zoll@mcpsmd.org

Latin

  • Robert Johnson – Robert_W_JohnsonIII@mcpsmd.org

Spanish

  • Karen Araujo – Karen_L_Araujo@mcpsmd.org
  • Leyla Cook – Leyla_G_Cook@mcpsmd.org
  • Dianette Coombs – Dianette_Coombs@mcpsmd.org
  • María Cuadrado Corrales – Maria_A_CuadradoCorrales@mcpsmd.org
  • Sonnia Davison – Sonnia_L_Davison@mcpsmd.org
  • Kerri Galloway – Kerri_Galloway@mcpsmd.org
  • Robert Johnson – Robert_W_JohnsonIII@mcpsmd.org
  • Sabrina Kalin – Sabrina_A_KalinMartinez@mcpsmd.org
  • Dora Santiago-González – Dora_N_Santiago-Gonzalez@mcpsmd.org
  • Gale Shipp – Gale_R_Shipp@mcpsmd.org
  • Mbaya Subayi – Mbaya_K_Subayi@mcpsmd.org

Departmental Goals:

The goal of the Montgomery Blair High School World Languages Program is to expose students to language and culture in order to make them knowledgeable and active members of a global society. Students will learn to use world languages for meaningful communication in both spoken and written form. The World Languages Program emphasizes language as it is used in various real-life situations that students are most likely to encounter. Through the study of world languages, students develop sensitivity to the cultural and linguistic heritage of other groups and their influence on our own, and are prepared to participate in a society characterized by linguistic and cultural diversity.

Overarching Enduring Understandings:

  • As the world moves towards a global community, it is increasingly important to be able to communicate in languages other than English.
  • It is important to understand the perspectives of a culture that generate its patterns of behavior, ways of life, world views, and contributions.
  • Proficiency in a world language is a vehicle to gaining knowledge that can only be acquired through that language and its culture.
  • The study of modern world languages enables students to develop insights into the nature of language and culture.
  • Learning a world language enables an individual to participate in multilingual communities.

The study of a language system involves learning vocabulary and structures in the context of the meaning one wishes to convey. It also involves nonverbal communication, knowledge of status and discourse style, and at times, the learning of a whole new alphabet. Communication strategies must be taught to enable students to use circumlocution, and to derive meaning from context. Direct instruction in language learning strategies is part of the experience. Through the study of language, students make comparisons and connections to other cultures and other disciplines.

Frequent on-going assessment of students’ progress in the world language is essential. Teachers pre-assess knowledge of vocabulary, structures, and reading content before actual instruction begins. Formative assessments occur at regular intervals during the instructional stage to check for understanding and mastery of the material taught. Summative assessments evaluate all the goals in the standards and mirror the activities used to teach the topics.

Courses:

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL)

American Sign Language (ASL) 1 – (1 credit) In Level 1, students use American Sign Language to communicate about daily life with basic vocabulary and simple grammatical structures. They explore the cultural and linguistic heritage of the Deaf community and its influence. The vocabulary that students learn is directly related to the purposes and situations identified with each topic. Teachers will also select vocabulary to reflect the students’ needs and interests in each thematic topic. Thematic units include: greetings and introductions, clothing, family, food, school, community, leisure time, and storytelling.

ARABIC

Arabic 1, 2, & 3 – (1 credit each; Level 3 is an Honors level course)   Arabic Levels 1 through 3 are organized into four overarching themes in each level with a variety of related topics within each theme. Within a given theme area, the performance indicators of the communication goal are the primary focus and the performance indicators in the goal areas of culture, comparisons, connections, and communities provide broader connections in which to learn the language. The vocabulary that the students learn is directly related to the purposes and situations identified with each topic. Teachers will also select vocabulary to reflect the students’ needs and interests in each thematic topic. Vocabulary acquisition is heavily emphasized over linguistic competence at these levels, although a greater emphasis on structural accuracy to enhance communication occurs in each year of successive language study. When communicating in the foreign language, both in writing and in conversation, the quality of communication of purpose and message are stressed over grammatical accuracy. Grammar skills are important as they aid in effective communication. Standards for grammatical accuracy increase as the students’ language study progresses.

FRENCH

French 1, 2, & 3 – (1 credit each; Level 3 is an Honors level course) In Levels 1 – 3, the vocabulary that the students learn is directly related to the purposes and situations identified with each topic. Teachers will also select vocabulary to reflect the students’ needs and interests in each thematic topic. Vocabulary instruction is heavily emphasized over linguistic competence at these levels, although a greater emphasis on structural accuracy to enhance communication occurs in each year of successive language study.

French 4 & 5 – (1 credit each; Honors level) The instruction is based on a broad array of interdisciplinary context and themes with increasing emphasis on refining language use appropriate to various sociocultural contexts. At each level of instruction, students learn to communicate using themes areas or content. Students at this level, work with an increasing number of authentic listening materials selected by the teacher. Students continue to expand and refine their ability to communicate in both oral and written form, to understand as well as produce language, and to do it in ways that reflect an understanding and appreciation of the target culture. Increasingly, literature may serve as a vehicle of attaining course objectives.

French 6 & A.P. French Language and Culture – (1 credit each; Honors level)  The goal of the upper level French program is to make students more knowledgeable and active members of a global society. These courses place high emphasis on the mastery of linguistic competencies at a very high level of proficiency. Students use French for meaningful communication with increasing accuracy in both spoken and written forms. The upper level French language program transitions the students from the use of language as it is used in everyday real-life situations to using the language more in depth in order to expand their knowledge of the francophone cultures in the many French-speaking communities and countries. Both French 6 and A.P. French prepare students for the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture examination.
Students enrolled in these courses are eager to challenge themselves with a rigorous curriculum. The courses are conducted entirely in French and provide opportunities for students to develop their proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication from the Intermediate to Pre-Advanced range of competency.

JAPANESE

Japanese 1, 2, 3, & 4 – (1 credit each; Levels 3, 4 are Honors courses)    Japanese Levels 1 through 4 are organized into four overarching themes in each level with a variety of related topics within each theme. Within a given theme area, the performance indicators of the communication goal are the primary focus and the performance indicators in the goal areas of culture, comparisons, connections, and communities provide broader connections in which to learn the language. The vocabulary that the students learn is directly related to the purposes and situations identified with each topic. Teachers will also select vocabulary to reflect the students’ needs and interests in each thematic topic. Vocabulary acquisition is heavily emphasized over linguistic competence at these levels, although a greater emphasis on structural accuracy to enhance communication occurs in each year of successive language study. When communicating in the foreign language, both in writing and in conversation, the quality of communication of purpose and message are stressed over grammatical accuracy. Grammar skills are important as they aid in effective communication. Standards for grammatical accuracy increase as the students’ language study progresses.

A.P. Japanese Language and Culture – The Advanced Placement (A.P.) course places high emphasis on the mastery of linguistic competencies at a very high level of proficiency. The goal of the AP Japanese course is to make students more knowledgeable and active members of a global society. Students use Japanese for meaningful communication with increasing accuracy in both spoken and written forms. The program transitions the students from the use of language as it is used in everyday real-life situations to using the language more in depth in order to expand their knowledge of Japanese communities.

The course prepares students for the A.P. Japanese Language and Culture examination. The exam is approximately three hours in length. It assesses interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Japanese along with knowledge of Japanese culture. The exam is computer-based. Each student works at an individual computer, which processes everything read, heard, written, or spoken by the student. That is, the student reads on the screen, listens through headphones, types using the keyboard, and speaks into a microphone. There is no paper component; although the student may use paper to take notes during the exam, the proctor will collect the notes at the end of the exam, and they will not be scored.

LATIN

Latin 1 & 2 – (1 credit each) In Levels 1 – 2, the concentration is on the basic elements of Latin grammar. Students continue to master the basic structures of Latin, using listening, speaking, and writing as means of increasing their reading comprehension and translating skills. Attention is focused on Latin word building (roots, prefixes, spelling changes in compounds, and word families) and related patterns in English and modern languages. Through the reading in text and enrichment translations and activities, students continue to learn about the daily life and values of the early Romans, gain insights into the classical heritage of the Western world, and the events of Roman world and its impact on contemporary life. Students in both levels will prepare to take the National Latin Exam during the second week of March in order to measure their knowledge of the language.

Latin 3 – (1 credit; Honors level) In this course students concentrate on the prose writings of some major Latin authors. They translate Cicero and learn the hallmarks of his style. They also read selections from other writers. Readings in Medieval Latin or Roman satire complete the study of Latin prose writers. Students examine the advanced grammatical structures found in the writings of Cicero. They also focus on the use of rhythm, word placement, and rhetorical devices as tools in the hands of a Latin orator or prose writer. In the second semester, the course focuses on poetry and the lighter themes of Latin literature. Students read the lyric poems of Horace and Catullus, and the verses of Ovid. They may read scenes from a comedy by Plautus. In connection with their readings, students learn basic metrical schemes, poetic devices, and special grammatical forms used by poets. Students begin to read Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and translate it in preparation for taking the A. P. course in their senior year. Students will prepare to take the National Latin Exam during the second week of March in order to measure their knowledge of the language.

A.P. Latin – (1 credit; Honors level) This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Latin Literature Exam. The course offers selections from Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Caesar, Vergil and Ovid. The examination is designed to test the candidate's ability to read, translate, understand, analyze, and interpret the required selections. In addition, AP Latin courses include the study of the cultural, social, and political context of the literature on the syllabus. Students will prepare to take the National Latin Exam during the second week of March in order to measure their knowledge of the language.

SPANISH

Spanish 1, 2, & 3 – (1 credit each; level 3 is an Honors level course) In Levels 1 – 3, the vocabulary that the students learn is directly related to the purposes and situations identified with each topic. Teachers will also select vocabulary to reflect the students’ needs and interests in each thematic topic. Vocabulary instruction is heavily emphasized over linguistic competence at these levels, although a greater emphasis on structural accuracy to enhance communication occurs in each year of successive language study.

Spanish 4 & 5 – (1 credit each; Honors level) The instruction is based on a broad array of interdisciplinary context and themes with increasing emphasis on refining language use appropriate to various sociocultural contexts. At each level of instruction, students learn to communicate using themes areas or content. Students at this level, work with an increasing number of authentic listening materials selected by the teacher. Students continue to expand and refine their ability to communicate in both oral and written form, to understand as well as produce language, and to do it in ways that reflect an understanding and appreciation of the target culture. Increasingly, literature may serve as a vehicle of attaining course objectives.

Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1, 2, & 3 – (1 credit each; level 3 is an Honors level course) Spanish for Spanish speakers provides continuing language instruction for students who have a developed proficiency in Spanish. This course utilizes a language arts approach comparable to that of English courses offered to English-speaking students.

A.P. Spanish Language and Culture A.P. Spanish Literature – (1 credit each; Honors level) The Advanced Placement (A.P.) courses place high emphasis on the mastery of linguistic competencies at a very high level of proficiency. The goal of the A.P. Spanish courses is to make students more knowledgeable and active members of a global society. Students use Spanish for meaningful communication with increasing accuracy in both spoken and written forms. The program transitions the students from the use of language as it is used in everyday real-life situations to using the language more in depth in order to expand their knowledge of the many Spanish-speaking communities and countries of the world. The courses prepare students for the A.P. Spanish Language and Culture / A.P. Spanish Literature examinations.

Useful Links:

General:

http://montgomeryschoolsmd.org/curriculum/lang/programs/high_school.shtm
http://montgomeryschoolsmd.org/curriculum/lang/curriculum/vocabulary_lists.shtm

Arabic:

http://arabicalmasdar.org/

French:

http://www.fll.vt.edu/french/whyfrench.html
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/Unofficial/Canadiana/README.html
http://www.info-france.org/
http://www.urich.edu/~jpaulsen/civfrw3.html
http://www.edu.leeds.ac.uk/~jjsh/web-fr.htm
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/rene.oster/indexnoel.htm

TV/Radio/Communication

http://www.lemonde.fr/
http://www.liberation.com/
http://www.lefigaro.fr/
http://www.parismatch.com/

African Unit

http:/users.skynet.be/african/

Latin:

http://www.julen.net/ancient/
http://library.thinkquest.org/11402/
http://www.clubs.psu.edu/aegsa/rome/romec.html
http://www.ghgcorp.com/shetler/rome/
http://www.personal.psu.edu/users/w/x/wxk116/romeball.html

Dictionaries:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/
http://www.csbsju.edu/library/internet/latin.html

Spanish:

http://www.sispain.org/SiSpain/english/

Dictionaries

http://tradu.scig.uniovi.es/conjuga.html
http://www.rae.es
http://www.diccionarios.com

TV/Radio/Communication

http://www.elpais.es
http://www.abc.es
http://www.mega.com
http://www.telemundo.com
http://www.univision.co