Mathematics

(301) 649-2870
Resource Teacher: Celita Davis
Celita_M_Davis@mcpsmd.org

Jump to: Course Info | Summer Packets

Math Help: Individual teachers are available as per this schedule; math help for all classes is available in room 233 during lunch

The Staff:

  • Ty Allen – Precalculus / Quantitative Literacy – Tyrone_Allen@mcpsmd.org
  • Cory Boatman –Two-Year Algebra 2 / Algebra One – Cory_M_Boatman@mcpsmd.org
  • Maria Costello – Algebra 1 (ESOL) – Maria_Costello@mcpsmd.org
  • Celita Davis – Precalculus / College Test Prep – Celita_M_Davis@mcpsmd.org
  • Peter Engelmann – Two-year Algebra 2 / Calculus with Applications – Peter_D_Engelmann@mcpsmd.org
  • Jack Giles – AP Calculus BC / Honors Precalculus– John_G_Giles@mcpsmd.org
  • Grace Hsu – Calculus AB / MAPS – Grace_R_Hsu@mcpsmd.org
  • Crystal Johnson – Algebra 1 / Related Math – Crystal_L_Johnson@mcpsmd.org
  • Fulbert Lewedia – Algebra 1 / AP Calculus – Fulbert_Lewedia@mcpsmd.org
  • Earl Lindsey – Honors Algebra 2 / Geometry – Earl_W_Lindsey@mcpsmd.org
  • Megan Lusby – Geometry / AP Statistics – Megan_E_Lusby1@mcpsmd.org
  • Colleen McGurkin – Algebra 2 / Geometry – Colleen_A_McGurkin@mcpsmd.org
  • Diane Norris – Geometry / Honors Geometry – Diane_H_Norris@mcpsmd.org
  • Tung Pham – / Precalculus / Honors Precalculus – Tung_T_Pham@mcpsmd.org
  • Ayeshah Pope – Honors Algebra 2 / Quantitative Literacy / Algebra 1 – Ayeshah_Pope@mcpsmd.org
  • Kathy Robens – A.P. Statistics / Statistics and Mathematical Modeling – Kathleen_C_Robens@mcpsmd.org
  • Stacey Sanders – Algebra 2 / Honors Algebra 2 / Algebra 1– Stacey_A_Sanders@mcpsmd.org
  • Elliott Shiotani – Honors Geometry / Geometry – Elliott_Shiotani@mcpsmd.org
  • Nathaniel Sturm – Algebra 1 / Precalculus - Nathaniel_Sturm@mcpsmd.org
  • Kelley Swain – Algebra 1 – Kelley_A_Swain@mcpsmd.org
  • Kristin Werdann – Algebra 2 / Precalculus – Kristin_Werdann@mcpsmd.org
  • Lisa Wheatley – Algebra 2 / Honors Algebra 2 – Lisa_D_Wheatley@mcpsmd.org

Many of the courses require the use of a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator

The Courses:

All students must take 4 credits of mathematics, including 1 credit in algebra and 1 credit in geometry. Students who complete a calculus course may be exempted from the 4-credit requirement in mathematics. Students must consult with school counselors in advance to obtain full information about this credit waiver and its advisability. An overview of typical four-year math pathways is available here.

Algebra 1 (9th-11th grade; 1 credit) — This course studies the basic structure of real numbers, algebraic expressions, and functions. The topics studied are statistical organization and analysis, linear equations, inequalities, functions and systems, quadratic equations and functions, polynomial and radical expressions, and the elementary properties of functions. Mathematical modeling of real-life problems, problem solving, and the construction of appropriate linear models to fit data sets are the major themes of the course. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

Double Period Algebra 1 or ESOL Algebra 1 (9th-10th grade; 1 credit) — This is a double-period course which adds the curriculum of Related Math to the Algebra 1 curriculum. Related math adds essential mathematical concepts and skills necessary to function in authentic problem-solving situations. Support of the attainment of algebraic objectives (see Algebra I above) is provided. Use of technology in the problem-solving process is an integral component of the course. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

Geometry (9th-12th grade; 1 credit; may also be taken at the honors level) — Geometry is studied through the deductive development of relationships in the plane and space developed intuitively in previous years. Indicators include the geometry in art and nature, geometry as a mathematical system, congruent segments and angles, circle chords, secants and tangent segments, parallel and perpendicular lines, angle measure in triangles, direct and indirect triangle congruence proofs, solids in revolution, logic, similar triangles, the Pythagorean Theorem, geometric constructions, and surface area and volume of solids. The course requires purchase of a compass and a protractor.  Students are encouraged to get a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator for the second semester.

Double Period Geometry (9th-12th grade; 1 credit; may also be taken at the honors level) — This is a double-period course which adds the curriculum of Related Math to the Geometry curriculum. Related math adds essential mathematical concepts and skills necessary to function in authentic problem-solving situations. Geometry is studied through the deductive development of relationships in the plane and space developed intuitively in previous years. Indicators include the geometry in art and nature, geometry as a mathematical system, congruent segments and angles, circle chords, secants and tangent segments, parallel and perpendicular lines, angle measure in triangles, direct and indirect triangle congruence proofs, solids in revolution, logic, similar triangles, the Pythagorean Theorem, geometric constructions, and surface area and volume of solids. The course requires purchase of a compass and a protractor.  Students are encouraged to get a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator for the second semester.

Algebra 2 (10th-12th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Algebra) — Algebra 2 is the study of the complex number system, symbolic manipulation, and functions. Advanced algebraic and data analysis techniques incorporating the use of technology enable students to discuss, represent, and solve increasingly sophisticated real-world problems. Topics studied include the properties of functions, the algebra of functions, matrices, and systems of equations. Linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and rational functions are studied with an emphasis on making connections to other disciplines and as preparation for a multitude of careers. A principal goal is to apply advanced data analysis techniques to find the best fit model from all the important function models, justify the model,and us it to make predictions. Communication of the problem solving skills used and the conclusion reached is another major emphasis. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

Honors Algebra 2 (9th-10th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Geometry) — This is an intensive, accelerated course intended for the student with the motivation to prepare for advanced mathematics courses. Algebra 2 with Analysis focuses on the use of technology and data analysis to develop students' thinking, problem-solving and communication skills. Topics include the properties, applications, algebra, and parametric representation of functions, matrix algorithms, linear, quadratic, radical, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions. Data analysis techniques include the use of re-expression and residuals to find and verify best-fit rules. The final unit includes applications as well as the properties relevant to advanced mathematics. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

Two-year Algebra 2 — Algebra II formalizes and extends students’ algebra experiences from Algebra 1. Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Students extend their knowledge of statistics and explore probability in a two year sequence. Students will learn the first semester of Algebra II in the first year of the course, then learn the second semester of Algebra II in the second year of the course. Students will receive a full credit for each year of Two Year Algebra 2.

Pre-calculus (11th-12th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Algebra 2) — This course completes the formal study of the elementary functions begun in Algebra 1 and 2. Students use the mathematical and modeling skills previously developed to study and apply the trigonometric functions. The use of technology and problem solving are emphasized in units covering data analysis, circular functions, and trigonometric inverses and identities. Students will conduct research and write extensively as they prepare for higher levels of mathematics. The concepts of trigonometry are extended to the study of polar coordinates and complex numbers. conics and quadratic relations are introduced through a locus definition using polar representations. Discrete topics include the principals of mathematical induction, the Binomial Theorem, and sequences and series, where sequences are represented both explicitly and recursively. An oral and written modeling presentation by students provides culminating synthesis to the concept of function. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

Honors Pre-calculus (10th-11th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with Analysis) — The formal study of elementary functions is extended with the introduction of the trigonometric functions. Students apply technology, modeling, and problem solving skills to the study of these functions in units on circular functions, trigonometric identities and inverses, and applications of trigonometric functions. Vectors in two and three applications of trigonometric functions. Vectors in two and three dimensions are studied and applied. Problem simulations are explored in multiple representations: algebraic, graphical, and numeric. The trigonometric functions are applied to the study of polar coordinates and complex numbers. Conic sections and quadratic relations are introduced in polar representations. The concept of limit is applied to rational functions and to discrete functions such as indefinite sequences and series. The formal definition of limit is applied to proofs of the continuity of functions and provides a bridge to calculus. A culminating project provides synthesis of the concepts studied. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

Calculus with Applications (12th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Precalculus) — The introductory topics of this course include limits and continuity of functions, derivatives of functions, and their applications to problems. Students find derivatives numerically, represent derivatives graphically, and interpret the meaning of a derivative in real-world applications. Models of previously studied functions will be analyzed using calculus concepts. The topics developed include the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral. The understanding, properties, and applications of the definite integral are included as students learn to explain solutions to problems. Students will model real-world situations involving rates of change using difference or differential equations. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

AP Calculus (AB and BC Calculus) (12th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Precalculus with Analysis) — The topics studied in A.P. Calculus are those traditional offered in the first year of calculus in college, and design specifically for students who wish to obtain advanced placement in mathematics in college. Concepts are communicated graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. The basic topics studied include limits and continuity of functions, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions and their applications in problems. The advanced topics developed are applied include integration techniques, convergence tests for series, Taylor or Maclaurin series, elementary deferential equations, and hyperbolic functions. The course requires a TI-83+ Graphing Calculator.

ESOL Related Mathematics (9th-11th grade; 1 credit) — Designed for ESOL Level 2 and 3 students. This course reinforces essential pre-algebra concepts necessary for Algebra I. Topics of study include skill and concept development of algebraic formulas, percent, and ratio and proportion in algebraic problem-solving situations.

Quantitative Literacy — This course is designed to enhance students' abilities in mathematical decision-making and financial literacy. Topics in mathematical decision-making include issues in health and social sciences, fair division, apportionment, and the mathematics of chance. Financial literacy topics include individual budgeting, investing, credit, and loans. Also including are business topics including starting and maintaining a business. Emphasis is on the mathematical aspects of the topics.

Statistics and Mathematical Modeling (11th-12th grade; 1 credit; Prerequisite: Algebra 2) — This course requires a knowledge and use of the TI-83+/ TI-84 Graphing Calculator. Statistics students engage in the exploratory analysis of data, using graphical and numerical techniques. Data sets are collected using statistical design methods, such as stem and leaf plots, histograms, box plots, standard deviations, normal distributions and binormal distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. Students produce appropriate models using probability, simulation, and statistical inference. Models are used to draw conclusions from data and analyzed by inferential methods to determine whether the data support or discredit the model. This course is equivalent to a non-calculus-based introductory college statistics course.


There are also several mathematics courses offered by the Magnet Program that are available to any Blair students who have completed the appropriate prerequisites. Students completing A.P. Calculus may take Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations (also known as Magnet Analysis 2) or Linear Algebra. Those completing Precalculus or higher may take Applied Statistics. Discrete Mathematics is offered for those who have completed Precalculus with Analysis and A.P. Computer Science. Finally, if a student manages to finish Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations before graduation, he/she may move onto Complex Analysis. Some of these courses may have additional prerequisites or other requirements; please see the Magnet Program's webpages and/or your guidance counselor for more information.