Special Education

(301) 649-2849
Resource Teacher: Vicky Shaffer
Vicky_D_Shaffer@mcpsmd.org

The Staff:

  • Patricia Beam – Paraeducator – Patricia_M_Beam@mcpsmd.org
  • Sylvia Braxton – Science – Sylvia_D_Braxton@mcpsmd.org
  • Consuleo Canaled – Paraeducator – Consuelo@mcpsmd.org
  • William Davis – Paraeducator – Celita_M_Davis@mcpsmd.org
  • Kane Denning-Evans – Speech & Language Pathologist – Kae_R_DenningEvans@mcpsmd.org
  • Susan Glick – Reading – Susan_I_Glick@mcpsmd.org
  • Jana Goss – English – Jana_S_Goss@mcpsmd.org
  • Beth Hanak – Advanced Resource Room – Beth_A_Hanak@mcpsmd.org
  • Danyel Hartfield – Resource Room – Danyel_Hartfield@mcpsmd.org
  • Jennifer Hiscock – Algebra / Resource Room – Jennifer_L_Hiscock@mcpsmd.org
  • Abigail Holmes – English – Abigail_E_Holmes@mcpsmd.org
  • Rebecca Hughes – U.S. History – Rebecca_Z_Hughes@mcpsmd.org
  • Amrita Kaur – Paraeducator – Amrita_P_Kaur@mcpsmd.org
  • Enrique Llanes – Transition Support– Rafael_E_Llanes@mcpsmd.org
  • Lisa Moran – English – Lisa_C_Moran@mcpsmd.org
  • Renee Newman – Paraeducator – Renee_Newman@mcpsmd.org
  • Beth Sanchez – Algebra / Resource Room – Beth_S_Sanchez@mcpsmd.org
  • Margery Scanlan – NSL Government – Margery_M_Scanlan@mcpsmd.org
  • Melvin Terry – Paraeducator – Melvin_R_TerryII@mcpsmd.org
  • Lousig Uslanian – Paraeducator – Lousig_Uslanian@mcpsmd.org
  • Erica Weintrop – English – Erica_R_Weintrop@mcpsmd.org
  • Kate Zimmerman – Paraeducator – Kathryn_Zimmerman@mcpsmd.org

The Courses:

Courses are marked with the discipline with which they are associated (e.g. Mathematics, English, Science, etc.). Please see the discipline's webpage for further information, if desired.

Algebra 1 and Related Math (Mathematics; 2 credits) This double period course is co-taught with a special educator and math teacher. These teachers follow the general education curriculum. It is double period so that students may have math daily with the block schedule.

Biology (Science; 1 credit; fulfills the biology requirement; may also be taken at the honors level; Physical Science is highly recommended course to precede this course) – This course emphasizes the study of living things through laboratory experiences and investigative techniques. Biology includes the topics of ecology, cytology, reproduction, genetics, scientific evolution, and taxonomy. Attention is given to pertinent social issues and career opportunities related to the biological sciences. This course is offered as an inclusion course using a dual-certified science/special education teacher.

College & Career Research Development (Career Education; 10th-12th grades; 1 credit) – Prepare for in school work through self awareness (interests, skills, aptitudes, and values) Infused are work ethics, team work, employee-employer relationships, banking skills, decision making and career planning. The second semester focuses on the process of getting a job including resource, writing a resume, preparing for an interview, filling out applications, answering ads by phone, letter and in person. Tips for how to keep a job and what to expect when employed are reviewed. Finally asking for a raise and what to do when fired and how to quit a job are covered.

Developmental Reading (English; all grades; 1/2 credit each semester) – This self-contained program was created for students reading below grade level with difficulties in decoding words. It uses a multi-sensory approach to improve reading and spelling, as well as emphasis on listening comprehension skills. Students acquire strategies for expanding their vocabulary and have opportunities to read for personal and academic enrichment. Research based reading interventions are employed as well as assistive technology explored. Taught by a special educator and a special education paraeducator.

English 9 (English; 9th grade; 1 credit) – This course integrates all the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing) and the processes (language and literature) in a thematic organization. Students experience texts of different genres and forms related to each theme and complete mandatory common tasks. Common tasks focus primarily on the writing process but also develop other language skills. Instruction in reading and writing strategies, grammar and vocabulary is integrated into every unit. All students begin the compilation of a high school "showcase" portfolio. This is an inclusion course.

English 10 (English; 10th grade; 1 credit) –This course integrates all the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing) and the processes (language and literature) in a thematic organization. Students experience texts of different genres and forms related to each theme and complete mandatory common tasks. Common tasks focus primarily on critical reading and writing and research but also address other language skills. Instruction in reading and writing strategies, grammar and vocabulary is integrated into every unit. All students continue and extend their high school "showcase" portfolios. This course is offered as an inclusion course.

English 11 (English; 11th grade; 1 credit) – This course integrates all the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing) and the processes (language and literature) in a thematic organization. Students experience texts of different genres and forms related to each theme and complete mandatory common tasks. Common tasks focus primarily on the writing process but also develop other language skills. Instruction in reading and writing strategies, grammar and vocabulary is integrated into every unit. All students continue and extend their high school "showcase" portfolios. This course is offered as an inclusion course.

English 12 (English; 12th grade; 1 credit) –This course integrates all the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing) and the processes (language and literature) in a thematic organization. Students experience texts of different genres and forms related to each theme and complete mandatory common tasks. Common tasks focus primarily on developing practical and persuasive forms of communication. Instruction in reading and writing strategies, grammar and vocabulary is integrated into every unit. All students reflect on and complete their high school "showcase" portfolios. This course is offered as an inclusion course.

Geometry and Principles of Geometry (Mathematics; 2 credits) This double period course is co-taught with a paraeducator and math teacher. These teachers follow the general education curriculum. It is double period so that students may have math daily with the block schedule.

Physical Science (Science; 1 credit; fulfills the physical science requirement; may also be taken at the honors level) – This is a laboratory-oriented, equipment-based physical science course that emphasizes chemistry and physics concepts and the development of observation, experimentation, and analysis skills applicable to succeeding laboratory courses in high school science. Students work with scientific instruments and materials in a problem-solving context. First semester includes an introductory unit on scientific skills and processes, waves and their properties, mechanics (forces and motion), and electricity and magnetism. Second semester includes physical properties, chemical properties, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. This class is offered with the inclusion model using paraeducators.

Modern World History (11th/12th grade; 1 credit) – Semester one of this course surveys the history of Europe and Russia from 1500 to the present. Emphasis is given to the Age of Exploration, nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, and revolution. Semester two surveys the history of Africa, Asia, and Latin America from early beginnings to the present. Emphasis is given to the development of traditional culture, the impact of European contact, the rise of nationalism, and periods of revolution. The course helps students understand contemporary society in all regions studied. This class is offered with the inclusion model using a paraeducator.

National, State, and Local (NSL) Government (Social Studies; 10th grade; 1 credit) – In the first semester of this course, students learn the basic purposes of government; the structure, function, and workings of government; the rights and responsibilities of citizens,; and the change processes that keep American government workable. Emphasis is placed on the similarity of the structure and functions of governments at the national, state, and local levels. In the second semester, the course involves critical issues that have faced Americans since 1945. The units of study include human rights, the United States in world affairs, and economics. This class is offered with the inclusion model using a special educator or paraeducator.

On the Job Training (OJT) (Grades 11-12; credits vary according to class length) – In this one period class students become MCPS employees by obtaining a job with a department or teacher at Blair High School. Each student fills out the MCPS application, provides appropriate documentation and is involved in an interview at MCPS Personnel Office. The students develop work skills, work habits, participate in evaluations and obtain references for further employment. Out of school OJT is also offered. Students work in the community in paid and unpaid positions. They work from 15-20 hours each week. It offers them the opportunity to do job try-outs, gain experience, and transfer their job skills from the classroom to the work world.

Periodic Pullout/Consult (No credit) This service is available for students who do not need specific content related support but need on-going direct and indirect support in managing their disability and accessing the general education curriculum.

Resource (Grades 9-12) This class is a self-contained class of mixed grade students who have similar special needs according to their IEPs. Additional support is offered to increase success, as well as strategy instruction to facilitate access to the general education curriculum.

U.S. History (9th grade; 1 credit) – The first semester of this course surveys our country's history from 1763 through the end of the Civil War. The American Revolution and the National Period are the first topics studied. The development of America during the the presidencies of Jefferson and Jackson is analyzed in terms of territorial expansion and the evolution of democratic practices. The course ends with sectionalism and those forces that culminated in the Civil War. The second semester begins with Reconstruction and ends with the end of World War II. Reconstruction and the growth of American industry are the first topics studied. Emphasis is placed on the progress and problems of industrialization. Students analyze American's growing involvement in international affairs from the Spanish-American War through World War II. The course ends with a comparative study of "boom and bust," America in the 1920's and 1930's. This is an inclusion course.